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Judas's fate and the tragedy of human nature.

Updated: Oct 10, 2023

At the heart of this masterpiece lies a profound question echoing through the corridors of time: Why did Christ welcome Judah into his inner circle? Why did a disciple, so close to the divine, falter in such a staggering way?


Welcome to upcoming conference titled "Judas's Fate and the Tragedy of Human Nature." This enlightening series will consist of four comprehensive articles that delve deep into the enigmatic character of Judas and the broader implications of human nature's intricacies and vulnerabilities. Over the course of this conference, readers can anticipate a journey through historical contexts, a psychological exploration of betrayal, an analysis of societal perceptions of Judas throughout the ages, and philosophical debates on predestination versus free will. Join us as we unpack the multidimensional aspects of one of history's most controversial figures and the profound lessons his story brings to the forefront of human experience. Stay tuned for a thought-provoking exploration that seeks to bridge ancient narratives with contemporary insights.


Leonardo Da Vinci, while crafting the masterpiece that is The Last Supper, wrestled with the deepest of human emotions. Every brushstroke conveyed a silent dialogue between his heart and canvas. Painting Christ and Judah, he discovered, was a journey laced with both anguish and insight. One of the monastery's leaders, baffled by the long gestation of the painting, pressed Leonardo on his delay. The genius, in a moment of vulnerability, admitted his struggle to find the right faces for Christ and Judah. But that very impatience from the monk provided the inspiration he needed for Judah's visage.


The characters of Christ and Judah stand out starkly in the tableau. While Christ exudes an ethereal glow, an inner sun shining through him, Judah is cast in shadows, as if the darkness within him seeks to eclipse the light. Some intricacies catch the observer's eye – Judah's head held lower, perhaps the weight of a bag filled with thirty pieces of silver, his gaze, so introspective, almost distant. The lone figure with an elbow carelessly sprawled across the table, and the spilt salt, a haunting reminder of the betrayal, all paint a story deeper than the canvas.


At the heart of this masterpiece lies a profound question echoing through the corridors of time: Why did Christ welcome Judah into his inner circle? Why did a disciple, so close to the divine, falter in such a staggering way? Delving into the cosmic mysteries of the number 12 offers a glimpse into this enigma. This number, with its celestial significance, represents the starry constellations, with Christ, the Sun, holding center stage. Just as the Sun nurtures the zodiac, Christ, surrounded by his twelve apostles, became a beacon of spiritual illumination on Earth. Each apostle, a reflection of humanity, resonates with a unique zodiac sign. For instance, Thomas, synonymous with the Gemini constellation, embodies duality. Similarly, the intense and enigmatic Judah mirrors the Scorpio. Questioning Judah's presence among the apostles is akin to challenging Scorpio's existence in the celestial wheel.


Scorpio, often symbolized by the lethal scorpion, carries the weighty archetype of death and rebirth. Governed by the transformative Pluto and fiery Mars, Scorpio souls tread the line between profound emotions and raw instincts. Their journey oscillates between material allure and spiritual transcendence, and they are known for their depth, passion, tenacity, and at times, a dangerous flirtation with the darker realms of the psyche. Scorpio's essence lies in its innate ability to push boundaries and seek metamorphosis, even if it means embracing the shadows.


Historical events echo the profound influence of Scorpio. The year 1492 saw the discovery of Pluto in Scorpio, and Columbus's groundbreaking voyage brought not only new lands but also the shadows of syphilis. Fast forward to 1983, with Pluto again in Scorpio's embrace, the world was introduced to AIDS.


In the heart of Da Vinci's painting and the mysteries of the zodiac, lies a tale of human nature, its brilliance, its shadows, and the eternal dance between light and darkness.



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